Betelgeuse lies some 642 light-years from Earth, yet it’s already one of the brightest stars in Earth’s sky. The reason is that Betelgeuse is a supergiant star — the largest type of star in the Universe. Betelgeuse has a luminosity about 10,000 times greater than that of the Sun and its radius is calculated to be about 370 times that of the sun. If it were positioned at the centre of our sun, its radius would extend out past the orbit of Mars.

How long does Betelgeuse have left?

Betelgeuse is a red supergiant star in the constellation Orion. It left the main sequence about one million years ago and has been a red supergiant for about 40,000 year.

Is Betelgeuse going to explode?

The red supergiant star appears to be in no danger of imminently exploding, even though a recent, dramatic dip in brightness hinted that it could be on its last legs. The latest observations reveal instead that the star is starting to regain its former light.

Will Betelgeuse kill us?

Within the next million years Betelgeuse is expected to explode. Luckily for us, it is around 642 light years away, far enough that when it explodes Earth is safe. When Betelgeuse explodes it will be so bright that it will outshine the full moon for over a month. … But it won’t destroy the Earth
If Betelgeuse exploded, transitioning from the red supergiant stage to supernova, it would light our sky continuously for two months. It could happen anytime — within a couple of thousand years, tomorrow or even now

What’s happening to Betelgeuse?

Betelgeuse, one of the brightest and most prominent stars in the winter sky, began dramatically and mysteriously dimming in the fall of 2019, dwindling to less than half its normal brightness. By February 2020, it was the faintest that it had been since measurements began more than 150 years ago.

Will the supernova in 2022 destroy Earth?

A supernova is a star explosion – destructive on a scale almost beyond human imagining. If our sun exploded as a supernova, the resulting shock wave probably wouldn’t destroy the whole Earth, but the side of Earth facing the sun would boil away. Clearly, the sun’s distance – 8 light-minutes away – isn’t safe.

Will we see a supernova in our lifetime?

It is possible but the odds of a single individual human seeing a super nova in their lifetime using only their naked eyes are low. On average however, a supernova occurs once every 50 years within the Milky Way or once a second somewhere in the universe.

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